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Basic accessibility

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Basic accessibility: together on the way to the mobility of tomorrow

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Where is there a great need for public transport? More public transport will be deployed in those places in the future:

  • trains on busy routes between cities;
  • buses and trams in city centres or to key destinations such as schools and hospitals.

In other words, we are matching our supply more closely to the demand from our travellers.

This is the key principle of basic accessibility, the Flemish government’s new transport model. Public transport is central to this model, but all kinds of transport are also coordinated with each other, making it easier to transfer and switch between individual systems, for example (cars, bicycles, scooters). We call this combination of coordinated means of transport combined mobility.

A lot of effort is currently being put into the new model so that it can be introduced by 2022. At De Lijn, we are of course working hard on it. How are we doing so and what does it mean for you?

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The basis: a layered transport model

The basic accessibility model is made up of four layers.

  1. The rail network: the backbone of public transport.
  2. The core network: the backbone of urban and regional transport. Buses and trams connect centres, serve centrally located key destinations and link suburbs with other cities.
  3. The supplementary network: buses between smaller cities and municipalities feed the core network and the rail network. Commuter journeys and transport between home and school that only exist during the rush hour can also form part of this network.
  4. Customised transport: local transport solutions for people with specific individual mobility needs who lack access to the other transport layers. Examples include transport for pupils in special education, demand-driven transport, adapted transport for wheelchair users, neighbourhood buses or collective taxis.

By coordinating these four layers optimally with one another, we can achieve an efficient transport model.

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HOW WILL YOU BENEFIT AS A TRAVELLER?

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How do you currently travel to school, work or other destinations? It’s very likely that you combine different means of transport: train, bus or tram, your own bike or car, a shared bike or scooter, ... If all these means of transport are coordinated even better, you will reach your destination more easily.

Precisely because we are placing maximum emphasis on the accessibility of major transport axes and through the seamless interlinking of the four layers of the network, you will therefore:

  • be able to travel more easily by public transport;
  • complete your journeys more quickly.

What exactly will change for you? You will receive more definite information about this in autumn 2021: which line you should take, what route it will follow, how often it will run, and so on.

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More info

Why is basic accessibility being introduced?

The aim of this Flemish government initiative is to ensure that you can travel easily and comfortably.

Vervoerregio’s: steden en gemeenten krijgen meer inspraak

Het openbaar vervoer écht afstemmen op de vraag? Dat kan alleen als we heel dicht bij de reizigers staan. Daarom is Vlaanderen ingedeeld in 15 vervoerregio’s.

Mobility centre for customised transport

Customised transport is being introduced for travellers with specific needs or living in very rural areas. This will be organised by the Mobility Centre.

Hoppin: bringing all mobility solutions together

What is the best way to combine all the different means of transport in practice? Using Hoppin.